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What to eat in Buenos Aires: the best tips on Argentine Gastronomy

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Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina, Latin America

Includes: Argentinian Restaurant Near Me | What To Eat in Buenos Aires | The best Tips on Argentine Gastronomy| Buenos Aires Food Travel Itinerary | Best Local Food


You will get Very special and local food Ideas from top-rated Buenos Aires Local Food

This curated Buenos Aires Food Travel Itinerary in a Google Map with Real Google Reviews and Photos can be used from your phone anytime

Click for 👀 Map Preview

 

Map Intro:

The Spanish touch is represented by locro (a stew made up of white beans, corn, pumpkin, sausage, bacon, tripe and pigs’ ears (or feet), onions, and peppers) and humita (equivalent to our pamonha). But together with the natives, they gave rise to criolla cuisine, which is responsible for barbecue, dulce de leche, empanadas, and other dishes.

The Italians, on the other hand, played a very important role, bringing with them their well-known pasta and allowing the enrichment of Buenos Aires cuisine through various dishes that didn’t exist there, such as gnocchi, pasta, pizza, ravioli, cannelloni, risottos, etc.

In addition to these preparations, the Italians also introduced condiments such as tomato sauce, the consumption of dried fruit, olive oil, and olives, as well as popularizing wine, a drink that is present in the gastronomy of the whole country.
And lest you be alarmed when you get there, the Hermanos have different eating habits from ours. If we Brazilians are used to hearing that we should “eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a commoner”, in Buenos Aires it’s quite the opposite.

The “desayuno” starts with a simple coffee or mate (a very common drink among them) and some tostadas (toast) or medialunas (croissants). For lunch, you can opt for a protein (chorizo steak or milanesas) and potatoes, for example. They don’t eat rice and beans like we do. Dinner, for porteños, is perhaps the most important meal of the day, and here come the asados (barbecue), the parrilladas (various cuts of meat served on a board), the cuts of beef, accompanied by a good ensalada (raw salad) or papas (potatoes), all washed down with a good wine.

So, if you’re planning to visit the land of our hermanos, here’s a list of what you can’t miss in Buenos Aires cuisine.

💠 Choripan!

Chorizo is like our sausage here in Brazil (and I’d even say in a better version, sorry Brazilians) and pan, which is bread in Spanish.

So add sausage to bread, and that’s what you get… Choripan!

It can be served with salsa criolla (vinaigrette), chimichurri, and many other ways!

The best place to eat it?

Street carts… Seriously, people! Because it’s super authentic—the face of Baires!

But you can find it at Las Cabras and El Parillón, which are on Costanera Sur.

💠 Meat!

Argentina is known as one of the largest and most famous beef producers in the world. That’s because the meat has a spectacular texture and tenderness!

Three important factors that make this dish so popular are:

– The beef breed is predominantly Angus and Hereford, both of British origin, which have adapted perfectly to Argentina’s cold climate and natural terrain.

– There, the cattle are raised on pastures in the flat, low-lying regions of the Pampinas, the central part of Argentina. With plenty of pasture, the cattle make minimal effort to feed themselves. These characteristics of Argentine pastures have a strong impact on the quality of the meat. As the cattle don’t need to spend energy climbing hills and exerting themselves in search of food, they don’t build muscle. In practice, this is synonymous with an animal that produces softer meat.

– Another interesting feature is slaughter. In Argentina, steers are only slaughtered at around 2 years of age, i.e., between 20 and 24 months. During this time, it is estimated that the animal has reached the ideal weight for slaughter, something approaching 450kg. In Brazil, to give you an idea, zebu steers are slaughtered six months earlier than Argentinian cattle, you know? And this factor influences the quality of the cuts, i.e., if the steer is too young, the meat is tasteless. If it’s too old, the cut will be tough. The Argentinians have found this balance with a perfect slaughter period.

In fact, Argentina is famous for the elements that help make up its culture. The reasons that make Argentine cuts so famous lead us to one more factor to include in their customs: care. The care that Argentinians take with their meat, from breeding to delivery, is not only an example of how to produce a great product but also of how to cultivate a culture.

Now, when you order at the restaurant, always say whether you want it marked (bleeding), al punto, or muy hecha (well done).

Source: Meat Society

💠 Fugazzetta Rellena!

The pizza of the Argentinian heart, and mine too!!!

It’s known for having lots of cheese and onions. And their cheese is terribly delicious!

But don’t be surprised if you see them eating pizza standing up; it’s quite normal. Or places that only take takeout orders. Oh, and there are also slices, where only the slice is sold!

Where to eat? Corrientes Avenue is the main street for Argentine pizzerias!

Want a suggestion? Visit the super-traditional Pizzeria Guerrin, which has been open since 1932.

💠 Alfajor!

This is the Brazilians’ favorite souvenir.

And it’s not just Havana; in my opinion, there are some just as good and even better! Like Cachafaz, Negro, and La Recoleta. I suggest you try them out and see which ones you prefer before focusing only on the most popular brand.

In addition, there are other types, such as cornstarch and El Rosario (a Cordoban alfajor with a fruit filling and sweetener).

What’s more, not many people know, but there is the Alfajor Helado (iced), which wins my heart.

💠 Dulce de leche!

In fact, anyone who tastes Argentinian dulce de leche never forgets it.

The Sancor brand is to die for—perfect consistency! And it’s sold here in Brazil.

But in Buenos Aires, you can find a variety of brands in supermarkets or in souvenir shops if you want to take a souvenir in a more “refined” version.

And the dulce de leche ice cream? A must! Don’t forget to add it to your list!

Most of the ice cream parlors prepare their ice cream by hand, in the Italian style, which gives it a distinctive flavor.

 

Of course, Argentine cuisine isn’t limited to just these items; there are many other mouth-watering options, and you can see this in the patisseries, cafés, and other restaurants, for example.

Allow yourself to explore this gastronomic universe and enjoy good food.

Here are some other “terms” to help you put together your tourist menu when you visit:=)

– Entraña: The name may sound strange, but it’s one of the tastiest cuts in the parrilla. Despite what the name suggests, it’s a beef cut from the outside of the diaphragm.

– Estofado de carne: a stew of meat, garlic, onion, tomato, carrot, bell pepper, fresh mushroom, and white wine Often used to accompany pasta.

– Guiso de lentejas: a stew often eaten in winter. Prepared with lentils, sausage, bacon, onions, tomatoes, and peppers.

– Matambre: very common on barbecues; the cut is from the rib region. It is also prepared rolled up, like a roulade, making it a typical Christmas dish.

– Matambrito: pork cutlet Accompanied by churrasquito, these are two pork delicacies found on barbecues.

– Puchero: a stew of beef, sausage, bones (marrow), carrots, leeks, cabbage, celery, sweet potatoes, corn and chickpeas

– Tamal: a version of pamonha but stuffed, very typical in the Salta region. The filling is usually onion, raisins, boiled eggs, and sometimes meat.

– Chocotorta: a national passion and classic, this dessert is like a pave, prepared with layers of chocolate cookies (chocolinas) and a cream of dulce de leche and cream cheese.

 

Thanks for visiting, and enjoy your trip.

 

🗺 Visit my Map Shop HERE for more hidden gems

Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina, Latin America

Includes: Argentinian Restaurant Near Me | What To Eat in Buenos Aires | The best Tips on Argentine Gastronomy| Buenos Aires Food Travel Itinerary | Best Local Food


You will get Very special and local food Ideas from top-rated Buenos Aires Local Food

This curated Buenos Aires Food Travel Itinerary in a Google Map with Real Google Reviews and Photos can be used from your phone anytime

Click for 👀 Map Preview

 

Map Intro:

The Spanish touch is represented by locro (a stew made up of white beans, corn, pumpkin, sausage, bacon, tripe and pigs’ ears (or feet), onions, and peppers) and humita (equivalent to our pamonha). But together with the natives, they gave rise to criolla cuisine, which is responsible for barbecue, dulce de leche, empanadas, and other dishes.

The Italians, on the other hand, played a very important role, bringing with them their well-known pasta and allowing the enrichment of Buenos Aires cuisine through various dishes that didn’t exist there, such as gnocchi, pasta, pizza, ravioli, cannelloni, risottos, etc.

In addition to these preparations, the Italians also introduced condiments such as tomato sauce, the consumption of dried fruit, olive oil, and olives, as well as popularizing wine, a drink that is present in the gastronomy of the whole country.
And lest you be alarmed when you get there, the Hermanos have different eating habits from ours. If we Brazilians are used to hearing that we should “eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a commoner”, in Buenos Aires it’s quite the opposite.

The “desayuno” starts with a simple coffee or mate (a very common drink among them) and some tostadas (toast) or medialunas (croissants). For lunch, you can opt for a protein (chorizo steak or milanesas) and potatoes, for example. They don’t eat rice and beans like we do. Dinner, for porteños, is perhaps the most important meal of the day, and here come the asados (barbecue), the parrilladas (various cuts of meat served on a board), the cuts of beef, accompanied by a good ensalada (raw salad) or papas (potatoes), all washed down with a good wine.

So, if you’re planning to visit the land of our hermanos, here’s a list of what you can’t miss in Buenos Aires cuisine.

💠 Choripan!

Chorizo is like our sausage here in Brazil (and I’d even say in a better version, sorry Brazilians) and pan, which is bread in Spanish.

So add sausage to bread, and that’s what you get… Choripan!

It can be served with salsa criolla (vinaigrette), chimichurri, and many other ways!

The best place to eat it?

Street carts… Seriously, people! Because it’s super authentic—the face of Baires!

But you can find it at Las Cabras and El Parillón, which are on Costanera Sur.

💠 Meat!

Argentina is known as one of the largest and most famous beef producers in the world. That’s because the meat has a spectacular texture and tenderness!

Three important factors that make this dish so popular are:

– The beef breed is predominantly Angus and Hereford, both of British origin, which have adapted perfectly to Argentina’s cold climate and natural terrain.

– There, the cattle are raised on pastures in the flat, low-lying regions of the Pampinas, the central part of Argentina. With plenty of pasture, the cattle make minimal effort to feed themselves. These characteristics of Argentine pastures have a strong impact on the quality of the meat. As the cattle don’t need to spend energy climbing hills and exerting themselves in search of food, they don’t build muscle. In practice, this is synonymous with an animal that produces softer meat.

– Another interesting feature is slaughter. In Argentina, steers are only slaughtered at around 2 years of age, i.e., between 20 and 24 months. During this time, it is estimated that the animal has reached the ideal weight for slaughter, something approaching 450kg. In Brazil, to give you an idea, zebu steers are slaughtered six months earlier than Argentinian cattle, you know? And this factor influences the quality of the cuts, i.e., if the steer is too young, the meat is tasteless. If it’s too old, the cut will be tough. The Argentinians have found this balance with a perfect slaughter period.

In fact, Argentina is famous for the elements that help make up its culture. The reasons that make Argentine cuts so famous lead us to one more factor to include in their customs: care. The care that Argentinians take with their meat, from breeding to delivery, is not only an example of how to produce a great product but also of how to cultivate a culture.

Now, when you order at the restaurant, always say whether you want it marked (bleeding), al punto, or muy hecha (well done).

Source: Meat Society

💠 Fugazzetta Rellena!

The pizza of the Argentinian heart, and mine too!!!

It’s known for having lots of cheese and onions. And their cheese is terribly delicious!

But don’t be surprised if you see them eating pizza standing up; it’s quite normal. Or places that only take takeout orders. Oh, and there are also slices, where only the slice is sold!

Where to eat? Corrientes Avenue is the main street for Argentine pizzerias!

Want a suggestion? Visit the super-traditional Pizzeria Guerrin, which has been open since 1932.

💠 Alfajor!

This is the Brazilians’ favorite souvenir.

And it’s not just Havana; in my opinion, there are some just as good and even better! Like Cachafaz, Negro, and La Recoleta. I suggest you try them out and see which ones you prefer before focusing only on the most popular brand.

In addition, there are other types, such as cornstarch and El Rosario (a Cordoban alfajor with a fruit filling and sweetener).

What’s more, not many people know, but there is the Alfajor Helado (iced), which wins my heart.

💠 Dulce de leche!

In fact, anyone who tastes Argentinian dulce de leche never forgets it.

The Sancor brand is to die for—perfect consistency! And it’s sold here in Brazil.

But in Buenos Aires, you can find a variety of brands in supermarkets or in souvenir shops if you want to take a souvenir in a more “refined” version.

And the dulce de leche ice cream? A must! Don’t forget to add it to your list!

Most of the ice cream parlors prepare their ice cream by hand, in the Italian style, which gives it a distinctive flavor.

 

Of course, Argentine cuisine isn’t limited to just these items; there are many other mouth-watering options, and you can see this in the patisseries, cafés, and other restaurants, for example.

Allow yourself to explore this gastronomic universe and enjoy good food.

Here are some other “terms” to help you put together your tourist menu when you visit:=)

– Entraña: The name may sound strange, but it’s one of the tastiest cuts in the parrilla. Despite what the name suggests, it’s a beef cut from the outside of the diaphragm.

– Estofado de carne: a stew of meat, garlic, onion, tomato, carrot, bell pepper, fresh mushroom, and white wine Often used to accompany pasta.

– Guiso de lentejas: a stew often eaten in winter. Prepared with lentils, sausage, bacon, onions, tomatoes, and peppers.

– Matambre: very common on barbecues; the cut is from the rib region. It is also prepared rolled up, like a roulade, making it a typical Christmas dish.

– Matambrito: pork cutlet Accompanied by churrasquito, these are two pork delicacies found on barbecues.

– Puchero: a stew of beef, sausage, bones (marrow), carrots, leeks, cabbage, celery, sweet potatoes, corn and chickpeas

– Tamal: a version of pamonha but stuffed, very typical in the Salta region. The filling is usually onion, raisins, boiled eggs, and sometimes meat.

– Chocotorta: a national passion and classic, this dessert is like a pave, prepared with layers of chocolate cookies (chocolinas) and a cream of dulce de leche and cream cheese.

 

Thanks for visiting, and enjoy your trip.

 

🗺 Visit my Map Shop HERE for more hidden gems

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